Dangerous Cargo Blog Tour

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Extremely delighted to be taking part in the Blog Tour this week for this fast paced, gritty and exciting crime thriller. Aiden McRaney is back for the 4th installment in the series – but this book can easily be read as a stand alone!

THE BLURB

Aidan McRaney is trying to stay away from his shadier past in this James Bond style thriller, but the offer of fifteen thousand pounds from Agency boss Nick Lombardi is too good to pass up. Lombardi needs someone to infiltrate the lair of ‘The Widow’.
No agent has survived previous missions and Lombardi believes it’s McRaney’s knowledge of the criminal underworld that will give him the edge. An arms dealer, The Widow is in league with the L.A. Mafia and has bought a house on a remote island off the Cornish coast, far enough away from the mainland where the arms can be both smuggled and tested. When Don Giorgio Avonicci arrives, accompanied by his female bodyguard, McRaney finds it’s not just the weapons being tested but his commitment to his wife in London.

This is the fourth book in the Aidan McRaney series which began with his release from prison in the book Stalking Aidan.

Amazon UK

To give you a little taster of what is in store if you read this book, the author has allowed me to share a little excerpt with you;

Excerpt from ‘Dangerous Cargo.’ 

 

 The address he had given me was a block of post-war flats, a paint flaked prefab  not  unlike a host of similar prefabs now being razed to the ground in various areas of London.  The City was moving with the times, but Grey Stoke Road appeared to be way behind them.  The flats were reached by a series of  stone steps badly in need of repair.  The kind of habitat where a man on the run might find himself.  A far cry from the charmer and playboy Daryl Harper purported to be.  Some of the windows were boarded up and the doors were battered enough  to appear as if they had been broken in to.  The street was quiet, an absence of birdsong serving as a reminder even our feathered friends had  forsaken the area for somewhere more upmarket.   In the distance a police siren, the rumble of traffic, but not in this seemingly dead and silent world. 

Having rung the bell a number of times only to receive no answer, I was about to move away when I had the prescience of mind to try the door.   Naturally expecting the door to be locked, I was surprised to discover  it was open.  For someone as scared as Daryl appeared to be, I thought it strange he would leave the door unlocked.  Unless of course as he was expecting me he might have been too scared to answer it.  

The place smelled  bad, the first thing I was aware of, though wrinkling my nose and sniffing the air made me realise  the smell was familiar.  I failed to pinpoint exactly what it was, but the odour was something metallic, almost coppery.  It was a sickly kind of scent, the kind that made you want to vomit.  As it was I found myself retching and, pulling a handkerchief from my jacket, held it over my nose while I moved from the hall  into what I figured to be the lounge.  The place was dark and dank. Thin curtains yanked across  the windows let in precious little light.  A sense of must and stale air pervaded the place, as if it had been shut up for a long time.  A collection of  yellowed newspapers on the floor only added to the rank vomit inducing stench.  No one lived here and probably had not lived here in months, or even years.  Angrily calling Daryl’s name yielded nothing but silence. 

   Apart from a dusty and battered table, a couple of broken chairs and an old scratched fridge, there was nothing.  “Come on, you bastard!” I hissed. Dust motes rose into the room as I inched further inside.  “If you’re fucking playing tricks on me, Harper, I’ll fucking…..” My sentence hung suspended, while simultaneously an exclamation of , “fuck, what the hell!” was forced from me when I almost tripped over something that was rolled up in a far corner.   Here the coppery stench was even more overpowering.  The something I had tripped over was a body.  Flinging one of the curtains aside, it ripped in my hands, the dust from the rotten fabric almost making me choke, but allowed enough light to filter into the dingy  room.   The body was that of  a man wearing a brown suit.  The suit was covered in dust.  The man was lying face down, and his hair was wet and sticking up at odd angles, plastered flat with a glutinous substance  that came away red in my hand when I touched his head.   My heart raced and I felt sick to my stomach.  The man was dead but not yet stiff.  Rigor Mortis had not set in for the body was  still warm. 

When I rolled him over Daryl Harper’s sightless eyes stared up at  me as if with accusation that I had been too late.  Another hole  had flowered up, seeping dried blood just above his left eye.  Under the body was a metal object I recognised as a Walther pistol.. The gun was mine. Now the unmistakeable wailing of sirens sounded remarkably close, almost as if they were outside. More sirens drawing nearer. Car doors banging . The echo of running  feet on stone  steps,  while I was leaning  over a dead man with a gun in my hand.

Q AND A

I have been lucky enough to have a chat with the author too and she has kindly answered a few questions for me to give you a little more insight into the book and author!

1: How long have you been writing, and what was the trigger to put pen to paper? 

I suppose I’ve been writing from about the age of eight.  As soon as I was able to read basically!  I wrote my first short story in an old exercise book…

 

2: Where does a character like Aidan come from? 

Aidan McRaney is based on the actor Aidan Turner (Poldark) with Jack Higgins’ protagonist Fallon from ‘A prayer For The Dying’ thrown in.  Like Fallon and Aidan Turner, Aidan McRaney is Irish.  I also draw on Higgins’ Irish stories set against the backdrop of the Troubles.

 

3: Will there be more books to follow in this series? 

Yes!  I am currently working on a fifth Aidan McRaney novel entitled, ‘The Duellists Club’. Garbed in the clothing of the period, a group of wealthy business re-enact 18th century duels, which is in reality the cover for an assassination bureau.

 

4: Are you working on any projects at the moment you would like to share? 

As well as working on The Duellists Club, I am actually writing my Memoirs about growing up in the Fifties and Sixties.  So much has happened in my life that my son suggested I should write a book.  The book deals with the taboo of a teenage pregnancy in a small village, sexual abuse in the workplace and from an Uncle. I’ll also talk about my relationships with an armed robber and a Hell’s Angel! Plus a thwarted plot to kidnap my baby by a woman who having had so many miscarriages had become unhinged. The working title is; ‘You Couldn’t Make it up: Memoirs of A Country Girl.’

 

I’m also working on a Historical Romance set in the 18th. Century called ‘Gallows Hill’. About a young man, whose father forfeits his lands to his unscrupulous cousin before dying, becomes a highwayman.

 

5: How important are reviews to Authors like you and has Social Media helped in this respect?  

Reviews are seemingly of vital importance especially to self-published authors.  As a voracious reader over the years I read a book and that was it. I either liked it and kept the book to read again, or if not, I gave the book to a charity shop. These days reviews appear to be the be all and end all for the self-published author.  The problem is trying to get a reader to write a review is akin to extracting the proverbial blood from a stone!  I feel guilty asking them to write a review, because it seems as if I’m hounding them.  I love writing and putting my book out there, but then cue the frustration of marketing and those reviews.  I guess Social Media has helped, certainly with sales.  Sorry to rant but to me writing a review is common courtesy!

Really hope that this has got you intrigued enough about the world of Aiden McRaney – go and buy the books!! –  and I would like to thank J.M. Shorney, the publishers and Bookollective for allowing me to take part in this fabulous Blog Tour!

My bookish weekly wrap up!

Yay for it being Friday again!!  And my favourite Daffodil in the garden – one i affectionately call the ‘Creme Egg’ Daff – has opened especially to mark the occasion!!  Nature does spoil us!!

So, on to the books!! Hope it has been a good bookish week for you all in one way or another!!  Fairly quiet on the reading front but 3 cracking books have been finished and it has been quite a good week for charity shop browsing ……

BOOKS BOUGHT

Found these two beauties in the British Heart Foundation shop in Southend when I just popped in to ‘browse’ and I couldn’t not adopt them and bring them home with me!!

Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett

The Outrun by Amy Liptrot

 

And then in an Oxfam charity shop I found the  hardback version of Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

 

 

BOOKS READ

The Hourglass by Tracy Rees  – loved it! 5 stars!

Publication Date 4th May 2017

2014. Sensible Nora has always taken success for granted, until suddenly her life begins to fall apart. Troubled by anxiety and nightmares, she finds herself drawn to the sweeping beaches of Tenby, a place she’s only been once before. Together with a local girl she rents a beautiful townhouse and slowly begins to settle in to her new life. But Tenby hides a secret, and Nora will soon discover that this little town by the sea has the power to heal even the most painful memories.

1950. Teenager Chloe visits Tenby every summer. She stays with relatives, and spends the long, IDYLLIC days on the beach. Every year is the same, until she meets a glamorous older boy and is instantly smitten. But on the night of their first date, Chloe comes to a realisation, the aftermath of which could haunt her forever.

The Hourglass is a moving novel about reinvention and reconciliation; about finding love even after it seems too late, about family and the healing power of a magical place by the sea.

Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones  – a magical read!! 5 stars

“How about making a bargain with me?” said the demon. “I’ll break your spell if you agree to break this contact I’m under.”

In the land of Ingary, where seven-league boots and cloaks of invisibility really exist, Sophie Hatter attracts the unwelcome attention of the Witch of the Waste, who puts a curse on her. Determined to make the best of things, Sophie travels to the one place where she might get help – the moving castle which hovers on the nearby hills.

But the castle belongs to the dreaded Wizard Howl whose appetite, they say, is satisfied only by the hearts of young girls…

An Account of the Decline of the Great Auk, according to one who saw it by Jessie Greengrass       stunning short story collection – 5 stars

 

The twelve stories in this startling collection range over centuries and across the world.

There are stories about those who are lonely, or estranged, or out of time. There are hauntings, both literal and metaphorical; and acts of cruelty and neglect, but also of penance.

Some stories concern themselves with the present, and the mundane circumstances in which people find themselves: a woman who feels stuck in her life imagines herself in different jobs – as a lighthouse keeper in Wales, or as a guard against polar bears in a research station in the Arctic.

Some stories concern themselves with the past: a sixteenth-century alchemist and doctor, whose arrogance blinds him to people’s dissatisfaction with their lives until he experiences it himself.

Finally, in the title story, a sailor gives his account – violent, occasionally funny and certainly tragic – of the decline of the Great Auk

BOOKPOST

Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips

‘It tore at every maternal fibre in my body. I couldn’t put it down.’ Fiona Barton, author of The Widow

Fierce Kingdom is a bold exploration of the ferocity of a mother’s love. Riveting and beautiful, and all too real, you’ll find yourself asking, what would I do? It’s brilliant.’ Shari Lapena, author of The Couple Next Door

************

Lincoln is a good boy. At the age of four, he is curious, clever and well behaved. He does as his mum says and knows what the rules are.

‘The rules are different today. The rules are that we hide and do not let the man with the gun find us.’

When an ordinary day at the zoo turns into a nightmare, Joan finds herself trapped with her beloved son. She must summon all her strength, find unexpected courage and protect Lincoln at all costs – even if it means crossing the line between right and wrong; between humanity and animal instinct.

It’s a line none of us would ever normally dream of crossing.

But sometimes the rules are different.

************

Unbearably tense and yet beautifully written, Fierce Kingdom demands to be read in one sitting. After finishing, I pulled my loved ones a little closer.’ Paula Daly

Publication Date June 15th 2017

Received this book – along with the 2 wildlife figurines (the tiger pic is one of my cross stitch pictures!) – today from the lovely people at Transworld Publishers and this looks like another stunning read that I hope to get to very soon!!  

 

And then this week I treated myself! I thought I was worth it!! I always have a nose around the bookish gifts and spotted the company Literary Emporium who were selling a limited edition lucky dip goodie box – how could I resist?!!  So included was a lovely classic Penguin book – who can resist an old book?! – along with a number of other bookish bits and bobs!  There are some lovely badges, bookmarks, an iron on transfer, fab notebook and some rather cool bookmarks so I was rather pleased with my purchases and recommend you go and check out their bookish gifts if you are looking for something a little different for friends who love books or you just want to treat yourself!!

HAPPY READING!!

An account of the decline of the great auk, according to one who saw it by Jessie Greengrass – Book Review

THE BLURB

The twelve stories in this startling collection range over centuries and across the world.

There are stories about those who are lonely, or estranged, or out of time. There are hauntings, both literal and metaphorical; and acts of cruelty and neglect, but also of penance.

Some stories concern themselves with the present, and the mundane circumstances in which people find themselves: a woman who feels stuck in her life imagines herself in different jobs – as a lighthouse keeper in Wales, or as a guard against polar bears in a research station in the Arctic.

Some stories concern themselves with the past: a sixteenth-century alchemist and doctor, whose arrogance blinds him to people’s dissatisfaction with their lives until he experiences it himself.

Finally, in the title story, a sailor gives his account – violent, occasionally funny and certainly tragic – of the decline of the Great Auk.

Publication Date March 23rd 2017

Amazon UK

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jessie Greengrass was born in 1982. She studied philosophy in Cambridge and London, where she now lives with her partner. She is a founder member of the Brautigan Free Press, and has appeared on London Fields Radio’s Page One talking about the work of Dorothy L Sayers. She has a great love for detective stories, and knows who the murderer is in almost every novel Agatha Christie ever wrote.

MY REVIEW

I have often found with short story collections that they all leave me feeling a little cold and wondering what the point of them was – there was none of that after reading this astonishing collection from Jessie Greengrass!

There are 12 stories contained and I only found 2 of them a little harder to get along with, but the others were such high quality and beautifully written that I often found myself nodding in agreement with sentiments, situations and messages gleaned from each story.

They are set in a variety of locations and bring up a number of subjects such as loneliness, grief, nature, childhoods, relationships – and I found that they made me think in different ways about the way I look at things.

The ones I struggled with were the ones about Theophrastus and Knut as I really didn’t ‘get’ them but I will be re-reading them in the hope that maybe in a different frame of mind all will become clear!   This is definitely a short story collection that I’ll be happy to dip in and out of again in the future!

Highly recommended!!

Thankyou to the publishers and BookBridgr for an ARC of this stunning book.

My Bookish Weekly Wrap Up!!

Greetings!!  The Daffodils are showing off their loveliness in the back garden and this week BOOKS have been showing off their loveliness to me in all their glory both story and cover wise!!  It has been a good week book wise!!  Hope you have had similar experiences this week!   And the weather has warmed up – bonus!! Always a good feeling not having to wear 6 layers before leaving the house – oops I’ve jinxed it now haven’t I?!  Watch out for  4 foot of snow to cover the country next week! Oops!!

On to books!!  I have read and received some stunning books this week so let me share the prettiness with you all!

BOOKS RECEIVED

 

These 4 were part of my #WorldBookDay online shopping spree at Alma Books .

First Impressions by Charlie Lovett

The Bookman’s Tale by Charlie Lovett

WabiSabi by Francesc Miralles

Love In Small Letters by Francesc Miralles

And as a member of the Urbane Book Club – where you pay £99.99 and get a copy of EVERY book that the publisher releases throughout the year, these wonderful 4 releases were delivered this week

The Gift Maker by Mark Mayes

Deadly Prospects by Clio Gray

All The Places I’ve Ever Lived by David Gaffney

The Single Soldier by George Costigan

 

Lucky enough to win a book via the GoodReads giveaway page this week too so this beauty arrived this morning

Swimming With Seals by Victoria Whitworth

 

And then via Nudge Books, these two books arrived for me to review this week

The Tulip Garden by Sarah Mathilde Callaway

The HourGlass by Tracy Rees

Bookshelves are at a critical overloaded stage again! Oops haha!!  So at least I am being restrained and not buying anymore …. at the moment at least!!

BOOKS READ

5 books read this week – 3 of which were 5 star rated!  Always a good bookish week when you stumble across some stunning stories!  Click on the headings if you want to read my GoodReads reviews!

The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel   5

Amazon UK

 

The WitchFinder’s Sister by Beth Underdown   5

Amazon UK

 

The Wild Air by Rebecca Mascull   5

Amazon UK

A Life Discarded by Alexander Masters  3

Amazon UK

The Tulip Garden by Sarah Mathilde Callaway  3

Amazon UK

And that just about wraps things up!!  And is the TBR pile a little more under control now that those are off the pile??!! Of course not!!  It is just getting more difficult deciding what to read next!!!  

HAPPY READING!!

The Witch Finder’s Sister by Beth Underdown – book review

THE BLURB

‘VIVID AND TERRIFYING’ Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the Train

The number of women my brother Matthew killed, so far as I can reckon it, is one hundred and six… 

1645. When Alice Hopkins’ husband dies in a tragic accident, she returns to the small Essex town of Manningtree, where her brother Matthew still lives.

But home is no longer a place of safety. Matthew has changed, and there are rumours spreading through the town: whispers of witchcraft, and of a great book, in which he is gathering women’s names.

To what lengths will Matthew’s obsession drive him?
And what choice will Alice make, when she finds herself at the very heart of his plan?

‘A richly told and utterly compelling tale, with shades of Hilary Mantel‘ Kate Hamer, author of The Girl in the Red Coat

Anyone who liked Cecilia Ekback’s Wolf Winter is going to love this‘ Natasha Pulley, author of The Watchmaker of Filigree Street

Beth Underdown grips us from the outset and won’t let go…at once a feminist parable and an old-fashioned, check-twice-under-the-bed thriller’ Patrick Gale, author of Notes from an Exhibition

‘A tense, surprising and elegantly-crafted novel‘ Ian McGuire, author of The North Water

‘Beth Underdown cleverly creates a compelling atmosphere of dread and claustrophobia… Even from the distance of nearly four hundred years, her Matthew Hopkins is a genuinely frightening monster’ Kate Riordan

Publication Date 2nd March 2017

Amazon UK

Hive.co.uk – buy online and support your local bookstore

MY REVIEW

As an Essex girl, born and bred, I’m always intrigued to read books set in the county so that got me interest in reading the blurb of this, along with the fact that it is loosely based on the real life character of  Matthew Hopkins ‘The Witchfinder General’ who is famous for his role in the killing of women in the 17th century around the region of Manningtree, who were thought to be witches. The fact that the evidence against those women – rumoured to be about 300 women in just under 3 years that were killed – was based mostly on rumours amongst villagers or even the fact that woman had a birthmark or mole – evidence enough for the witchfinders to condemn the women to hang.

In this book we follow the story of Alice, his sister, who in 1645 moved back to Manningtree to see her brother after the death of her husband. Her brother had always been strange and seen as different from a child, as he was badly burned in a fire as a child, but when Alice returns she notices a much darker side to his personality and learns of his life now as a witch finder and that he is killing women, but legally!.

Alice as a character in herself, is also an extremely interesting woman as she has dealt with much trauma in her life and her attempts to keep her brother from his quest is a brave one but a reckless one. He takes her out on his witch hunts to help with the ‘interrogation’ and it is quite harrowing to read of what he makes her do, and what the women under suspicion have to endure. She also begins to learn more of her recently deceased mother, and her father too which adds more depth to the story and shines some light on their troubled childhoods.

I really loved the pace of this book – it is a little slow at times, but that really helps the characters build and gives you a great insight to life at the time and in the surrounding areas which are wonderfully brought to life as his quest to hunt out more witches picks up pace. It never goes over the top and deals with subject matter in a calm and understated way.

It is fascinating to take a person from history and create a story around someone who there isn’t much known about his persona or personal life, and I think it works so well in this book to create an imagined storyline – it cleverly feels very real as the story picks up pace towards the end and I am now also inspired to read more about the Witch Trials and how this sad period of history was allowed to gather such pace.

A fascinating and well written debut and I look forward to reading more from the author in the future!  I will definitely be buying a copy of the beautiful hardback version to have on my bookshelves!

I received a copy of this via NetGalley and the publishers in return for a fair and honest review

Bookish Weekly Wrap Up!

Hello all!!  Hope you have all had a lovely bookish week – anyone do anything special for World Book Day?!  Enjoyed seeing all the photos of friends’ children all dressed up as various characters – just a shame that a lot of costumes nowadays are brought from shops! I miss the creativity – and randomness – of the homemade fancy dress outfits that used to do the rounds!! Sheets and bin bags were a must in my day for creating something wonderful to wear haha!!  Oh and I celebrated the day by buying some books! Well, I had to do something! 😉

Speaking of books it seems to have been an extremely busy one on the bookish front for me – just the way I like it!  So here’s a little peek into my bookish week;

BOOKPOST

 Dangerous Cargo by J.M. Shorney

Aidan McRaney is trying to stay away from his shadier past in this James Bond style thriller, but the offer of fifteen thousand pounds from Agency boss Nick Lombardi is too good to pass up. Lombardi needs someone to infiltrate the lair of The Widow. No agent has survived previous missions and Lombardi believes its McRaneys knowledge of the criminal underworld that will give him the edge. An arms dealer, The Widow is in league with the L.A. Mafia and has bought a house on a remote island off the Cornish coast, far enough away from the mainland where the arms can be both smuggled and tested. When Don Giorgio Avonicci arrives, accompanied by his female bodyguard, McRaney finds its not just the weapons being tested but his commitment to his wife in London. This is the fourth book in the Aidan McRaney series which began with his release from prison in the book Stalking Aidan.

Received this ahead of a Blog Tour that I’ll be part of at the end of the month and it’s a pulsating read so watch this space for more later!

AN ACCOUNT OF THE DECLINE OF THE GREAT AUK, ACCORDING TO ONE WHO SAW IT by JESSIE GREENGRASS

The twelve stories in this startling collection range over centuries and across the world.

There are stories about those who are lonely, or estranged, or out of time. There are hauntings, both literal and metaphorical; and acts of cruelty and neglect, but also of penance.

Some stories concern themselves with the present, and the mundane circumstances in which people find themselves: a woman who feels stuck in her life imagines herself in different jobs – as a lighthouse keeper in Wales, or as a guard against polar bears in a research station in the Arctic.

Some stories concern themselves with the past: a sixteenth-century alchemist and doctor, whose arrogance blinds him to people’s dissatisfaction with their lives until he experiences it himself.

Finally, in the title story, a sailor gives his account – violent, occasionally funny and certainly tragic – of the decline of the Great Auk

This is due out at the end of March and I received this via Bookbridgr as I’ve heard so many good things so am eager to dive in soon!

THE HOUSE OF MOUNTFATHOM by NIGEL MCDOWELL

Luke Mountfathom knows he is special and odd. He is told so by everyone he knows. His parents are special and odd too – they are the keepers of the House of Mountfathom, a magnificent stately home where the wrong door could take you to a far away land, and strange animals appear to stalk the grounds at midnight. The house is his home – but it is also the headquarters of the Driochta, a magic-weaving group of poets, artists, politicians and activists charged with keeping the peace in Ireland. They have many powers – have mastered Mirror-Predicting and Smoke-Summoning and Storm-Breaching – and a final ability: that of Mogrifying; taking on a unique animal form.

But Luke’s idyllic existence at Mountfathom cannot last. Word reaches the House of protests across Ireland. There is a wish for independence, a rising discontent and scenes of violence that even the Driochta cannot control. In Dublin, death and disease is running rife in the tenements; a darkness is clogging the air, and is intent on staying. And when things quickly spin out of control for the Driochta, it is up to Luke, his cat Morrigan and his best friend Killian to worm out the heart of the evil in their land.

 AN UNSUITABLE MARRIAGE by COLETTE DARTFORD

When the worst happens, could your marriage survive? A sharp and emotional novel of a family under pressure, perfect for fans of Joanna Trollope and Hilary Boyd.

Olivia always thought she had the perfect family life. A loving husband in Geoffrey, a thoughtful and intelligent son in Edward and a beautiful home in the Somerset countryside.

But all that changed when Geoffrey’s business went under. Now penniless and homeless, Geoffrey is living with his recently widowed mother, whilst Olivia has been forced to take a job as housemistress at her son’s elite boarding school.

Soon the cracks in the relationship start to show. And, increasingly desperate, Geoffrey makes a mistake. One that could have consequences for the whole family . . .

Received these two books via Readers First. I love both covers and the blurbs sound really fascinating on both counts so hoping the insides match the outsides!

BOOKS READ

Been a successful reading week too with 4 books finished  and all enjoyed too!  Have included my GoodRead review links with them!

The Whisperer by Elsa Winckler

A really enjoyable read exploring the bond between animals and humans – and the bond between humans!

Expected release 10th March 2017 – HarperImpulse

Amazon UK

The Moth Snowstorm by Michael McCarthy

 

Really loved this look at how we look at nature in the modern world and the scary future ahead with many species and habitats being destroyed.

See You In The Cosmos by Jack Cheng

A very sweet and powerful YA book about a boy who loves the stars

All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai

Loved this one! A real surprise to me!

So that is it! My week wrapped up! How has your bookish week been?! good? bad? indifferent?!  And what does the week ahead have in store for me?!  Yet more books!! March seems to be an extremely busy one on the book release front – dear publishers, please slow down the output of good books for a while, thankyou! – so i have a few from NetGalley and proofs to catch up with, alongside getting through my own mountain of books purchased! I assume I’m not alone with these issues!! 😉

Happy Reading!!

All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai – book review

THE BLURB

When Tom loses the love of his life, time travel seems like the only answer. . . what could possibly go wrong?

Elan Mastai’s breakthrough novel brings a whole new dimension to a classic love story

So, the thing is, I come from the world we were supposed to have.

That means nothing to you, obviously, because you live here, in the crappy world we do have.

But it never should’ve turned out like this. And it’s all my fault – well, me and to a lesser extent my father.

And, yeah, I guess a little bit Penelope.

In both worlds, she’s the love of my life. But only a single version of her can exist.

I have one impossible chance to fix history’s greatest mistake and save this broken world.

Except it means saving one Penelope and losing the other forever – and I have absolutely no idea which to choose . . .
Praise for All Our Wrong Todays

‘A thrilling tale of time travel and alternate timelines with a refreshingly optimistic view of humanity’s future’
Andy Weir, author of international bestseller The Martian

‘A novel about time travel has no right to be this engaging. A novel this engaging has no right to be this smart. And a novel this smart has no right to be this funny. Or insightful. Or immersive. Basically, this novel has no right to exist.”
Jonathan TropperNew York Times bestselling author of This Is Where I Leave You and One Last Thing Before I Go

‘Elan Mastai has conjured up a witty and freewheeling time-traveling romance that packs an emotional wallop.All Our Wrong Todays is a page-turning delight’
Maria Semple, author of Today Will Be Different and Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Amazon UK – Kindle edition out now.  Hardback release date 2nd March 2017

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

“All Our Wrong Todays” is my first novel, but I’ve been working for the past 15 years as a screenwriter. I’ve written movies for both independent production companies and the Hollywood studios, including scripts for Fox, Sony, Warner Brothers, and Paramount. My most recent film is “What If”—also known as “The F Word”—a comedy starring Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Adam Driver, Mackenzie Davis, Megan Park, and Rafe Spall, directed by Michael Dowse. I was fortunate to win the Canadian Academy Award and the Writers Guild of Canada Award for my screenplay. I was born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia and currently live in Toronto, Ontario with my wife and kids and an Australian Shepherd named Ruby Slippers.

MY REVIEW

Wasn’t really sure what to expect when I started this! I don’t read that much sci-fi and seeing the time travel element of this story had me a little worried as to what was in store for me as a reader – I just wish I could send myself back in a time-machine now and start reading this all again so I can savour it all once more!! Loved it!

Tom Barren lives in 2016 – but a 2016 unlike ours! It is full of automated life, decisions made for you – a world where everything is perfect. Sounds idyllic?! Not for Tom and he’s nostalgic for the real world of good and bad experiences. Tom is the perfect character to be the narrator of this story as he’s the idiot to his genius father – never seemingly good enough and missing his beloved mother. So we get to enjoy and share his every thought and action as he tries to live up to something he isn’t – he’s not quite sure what he’s supposed to be so when a chance to achieve some respect from his father by travelling back in time to witness the moment in time that changed the world as we know it – Lionel Goettreider invented the future in 1965 and he is the most famous man in the alternate 2016 timeline as his vision became their reality.

So what happens if the impossible happens and we could travel back in time to witness those moments in time that we all know so much about? Tom is about to find out and things aren’t all as he imagined – the genius plan had some pretty big flaws! And then what happens when you return from that moment and your version of 2016 has changed beyond recognition?! Full of people you know, but don’t know at all?!

This is more than a sci-fi/time travel novel as it features a lot of human emotion as he deals with love, grief and all those self doubts that we as humans often feel. And it is also very funny!   It is written in a really punchy way and never gets bogged down in too much ‘geeky’ detail and that is what kept me engrossed from start to finish. I loved the Tom character along with Penelope too who had her own dreams but her destiny was also changed by a quirk of fate and, like life, leads on to new experiences and dreams to unfold.

This exceeded my expectations so I can highly recommend it for those of you looking for something a little out of the ordinary!